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24

Jul

The color photography of Elliott Erwitt  c. 1950s-1970s

(Source: vintagegal)

(Source: bunnzies)

23

Jul

choconoke:

Hanami 2014
Me & donutdisaster in Roihuvuori Hanami Picnic.

tegeues:

Tagged by foolsxgoldx and sexualanomaly (thanks!)

Decided to tag bonafidepersonofshadesushayface, bootygameofficial, singsongstardust, hayandrea, thisurlishumorous, and whomever else is comfortable posing pictures. 

22

Jul

idon-tevenwantoknow:

THERE’S TIMES WHEN I WANT A RUSTIC CABIN IN THE WOODS AWAY FROM ALL SOCIETYimage

THEN THERE’S TIMES WHEN I WANT A MODERN ASS HOUSE image

THEN I’M LIKE I’LL ACCEPT NOTHING MORE THAN A VICTORIAN MANOR
image

THEN I WANT A PENTHOUSE IN THE MIDDLE OF NEW YORK
image

THEN I WANT ONE OF THOSE HOUSE MADE OUT SHIPPING CONTAINERSimage

THEN I WANT A FRENCH CHATEAUimage

BUT I ALSO WANT A TREE HOUSEimage

AND FALLINGWATER image

AND A LITTLE COTTAGE ON THE OCEANimage

HOUSES ARE SO COOL

Macaron recipe, plus buttercream filling

Project for bike lanes on Peachtree Rd. stalled by opposition in Buckhead

atlurbanist:

image

The push back

Atlanta City Councilwoman Mary Norwood has decided to back a group of bike-lane-phobic residents who oppose adding a new bike lane on Peachtree Road in north Atlanta’s Buckhead area. Buckhead View has the story (great coverage, btw).

In a nutshell, a project to improve pedestrian safety via road diets (and more) and to add a bike lane in Buckhead’s Peachtree Road corridor — where there has been an incredible boom in offices and apartments in recent years — is now stalled due to neighborhood opposition.

Key quotes from the opposition:

  • From a Buckhead resident: “It’s scary to put a 17-pound bicycle up against a 4,000-pound car.”
  • From Mary Norwood (in Yoda-esque phrasing): “The idea of bicycle lanes and the road diet I am opposed to.”
  • David Allman, chairman of the Buckhead CID board: “Our first and foremost priority is addressing existing and future automobile traffic.”

The push-back on these bike lanes shows a lack of vision for this section of Atlanta. Peachtree Road is Buckhead’s most promising artery for transformation into a functional, multi-modal ideal for a new generation of residents, workers, shoppers, visitor, students, etc.

Fighting the fears: bike lanes won’t hurt Buckhead

Fortunately for bicycle advocates, the data for adding a lane here is on our side.

For one thing, arguments that a bike lane might hurt business are wrong. Not only do bike lanes not hurt retail stores, but studies show that cyclists actually spend more money than drivers.

As for real estate values, bike-friendly housing is in growing demand in the US.

And when it comes to traffic congestion, the effect of taking away a car lane and adding a bike lane might not be what you think. Earlier this year, a traffic expert named Rock Miller (what a name!) argued that recent successes in other cities prove that congestion could be relieved by removing a car lane on a busy road in Calgary and replacing it with a cycle track:

Miller says…he has seen similar cycle tracks installed in both New York and Chicago in very similar situations — on busy downtown streets with few alternative routes for cars, in cities that are much more dense than Calgary — and after the lanes were installed, traffic started to actually move faster down those roads.

Keeping an eye on the future: let progress happen

In 2002, a report from the Atlanta Regional Commission — the  Buckhead Action Plan — outlined a great vision for Buckhead’s future that addressed transportation issues in a sustainable, forward-thinking way:

The vision for Buckhead includes a high-density, mixed-use core that forms a destination node surrounding the Buckhead MARTA Station and Peachtree Road. The high-density core ranges from Piedmont Road to Peachtree-Dunwoody with street front retail, landscaped pedestrian paths and dedicated bicycle routes.

It sounds just as good in 2014 as it did then. The pedestrian streetscape has been improved significantly here. In many key spots, Buckhead is a much nicer place to walk around than it was 10 years ago. Keep moving forward with this plan boldly! With an incredible amount of residential density building here via new apartments, this is no time to settle for a job half done.

Rather than prioritizing the movement of cars on Peachtree above all else — taking a step back in time — Buckhead would do well to remain committed to the established goal for for a greater diversity in transportation modes and tackle congestion by reducing the number of trips in single-occupancy cars. A bike lane on Peachtree would help.

Follow the money: cyclists spend it

And if “greater diversity in transportation modes” doesn’t rock your boat, how about money? Apparently, people on bikes spend it; and lanes bring them and their wallets into stores at a fast clip:

A recent report from the New York City Department of Transportation found significant evidence of the economic benefits of bike infrastructure…retail sales on Ninth Avenue are up 49 percent since the street’s protected bike lanes were installed – that’s 16 times the area growth rate.

My armchair-urbanist analysis of the situation: this project to put in a bike lane and pedestrian improvements on Peachtree Road in Buckhead could be a catalyst for creating public spaces there that are more vibrant and less car-dependent — more focused on serving people who are exploring the streets on foot & pedal rather than passing through them in a car. It would be sad to see this opportunity slip away.

stuffimgoingtohellfor:

hobbitkaiju:

bisouette:

"Open your mouth for me, Buck."

1. Hot >__>
2. I have such a love for caretaking in Steve/Bucky fic&art. I love the idea of Steve brushing Bucky’s teeth for him until he remembers how to do it himself, and feeding him, and generally taking care of him like he’s a fucking human being who deserves care and attention rather than an object to be used

your points are all super valid and I hate to drag this into a gutter buuuuuut…jaw touchesssssss

stuffimgoingtohellfor:

hobbitkaiju:

bisouette:

"Open your mouth for me, Buck."

1. Hot >__>

2. I have such a love for caretaking in Steve/Bucky fic&art. I love the idea of Steve brushing Bucky’s teeth for him until he remembers how to do it himself, and feeding him, and generally taking care of him like he’s a fucking human being who deserves care and attention rather than an object to be used

your points are all super valid and I hate to drag this into a gutter buuuuuut…jaw touchesssssss

Album Art
8,119 plays

(Source: musicalblogging)

21

Jul

pardonmybloomers:

abarero:

Metamorphose temps de fille: Secret Library print. Reservations begin today.

if ever I have needed a print desperately, it’s this one

because holy bejeebus it’s perfect

Anonymous said: will post the link to the apmas livestream please?

paxamgays:

http://www.ustream.tv/channel/dreamofmetonight

fionna-andcake:

gapingfurnace:

napoleon bonaparte

image

more like napoleon BORN2PARTY

image

I used this on a powerpoint for school and no one laughed except my friend and I

porn

fudgebrownys:

iammissanna:

tzikeh:

the-fault-in-our-wifi:

oh my fucking god

Everyone go home. The internet is over.

Okay, you know what? I just reblogged this but I wanna get geeky over it. ‘Cause this is some high-class humor right here, and if you don’t get that you need to be educated so here I am about to do the thing you’re not supposed to do and explain the joke, because I’m just really impressed by this joke’s construction, okay?
So back in Paris in the 1920s, the surrealist movement in art was just starting to take off. The surrealist movement was born from the dadaist movement, which was a response to strict societal ideas of what was “art” and what wasn’t. The dadaists made a lot of works to try and challenge society’s ideas of what art even was in the first place, and this continued on into the more sophisticated abstract works of surrealism.
One such artist, Rene Magritte (also known for his paintings of people with invisible heads, or with fruit for heads), painted a work called "The Treachery of Images," depicting a pipe, and underneath the words (in french) “This is Not a Pipe.” The words were meant to refer to the fact that the painted pipe was literally not a real physical pipe that a viewer could smoke out of, it was just a painting of a pipe.
The painting was extremely meta, and really challenged the habit of allowing oneself to get so immersed in a work of art that one forgets it is a created representation of life, and not actual life. Understanding that alone takes a good deal of abstract thinking ability. And really appreciating and enjoying it requires a certain amount of one’s own frustration with society’s habit of trying to put limits on the definition of art; and being unable to think outside the box and really see something from all possible perspectives, including the perspective of being completely outside the thing.
Now what’s even more fascinating to me is that modern art movements (and I don’t mean “modern art,” I mean actual contemporary art movements that are being led by our peers) are kinda doing the same thing the dadaist movement was doing, but in reaction to the art that came out of the dadaist movement. Things have circled back around again, and abstract surrealist art is now what society has decided “art” is. And our generation doesn’t accept that. Comics, video games, TV shows and movies, graffiti art, web series, even flash mobs, all of these are our generation’s way of saying, “no, society, you don’t get to define art as strictly as ‘if it doesn’t make sense to me it must be brilliant.’ Art can be simple to understand, art can be accessible to all people, art can make you beg to find out what happens next!” And that’s really interesting to me.
Flash forwards to 2006, when rapper Gucci Mane writes a song called "Pillz" in which the phrase “bitch I might be” was coined and used several times. In the song, it’s used as a sarcastic, somewhat indignant but not wholly angry way to say “it’s none of your business,” in response to a beautiful woman in a club accusing the rapper of being high. The phrase became a meme in 2013, following Gucci Mane’s indictment for assaulting a soldier, when a redditor photoshopped a screencap of news coverage of the trial to reference the song. The photoshopped image changed the previous on-screen text to read “Rapper Gucci Mane responds with ‘bitch I might be’ when asked if guilty”. Again, the usage of the phrase is a sarcastic and indignant “none of your business.” The phrase then quickly gained popularity and was added to numerous other photoshopped images.
Now, memes are really cool as a concept anyways, when you think about them hard enough (I mean, the speed at which an entire world full of young people are able to latch onto something as simple as a phrase that they all mutually find funny, and within a matter of days explore every possible usage and implication of that phrase, including how it might relate to other complex systems of knowledge and understanding such as the rich character and plot developments of stories that generate fandoms), but lets put that aside for now and talk about sarcasm, instead.
Because sarcasm is a very sophisticated, complex, and subtle form of wit. It’s a difficult thing to be able to understand, through tone of voice alone, that what someone says, and what they mean, are two different things. And to be able to discern the actual meaning when the words were not said. As wikipedia says, “different parts of the brain must work together to understand sarcasm.” It’s even harder when those words are typed and not spoken audibly, as the reader must imagine the tone in the first place. That’s a lot of brain work involved in even understanding the true meaning behind that simple little phrase.
And sarcasm is popular right now. More than popular, it’s a hallmark of our generation. People have been writing lengthy articles and psychological, sociological, and anthropological studies and musings on why we’re so sarcastic. As this article suggests, it’s because we’re so angry. We’re a generation that was promised a lot and the world didn’t deliver. We’re disenchanted, and jaded, and mad. And we vent that through sarcastic humor. We laugh at things older generations don’t think are funny. We have come to expect so much disappointment, that we no longer afford “serious” things the respect we’re told they deserve. Because we no longer believe they deserve it. As the article states, “We are a generation that believes nothing is sacred. And if nothing is sacred everything becomes profane.”
One could even go so far as to make the argument that the popularity of the statement on the above image is due partially to the attitude amongst today’s youth (especially on tumblr) that one’s own life and choices are one’s own, and not the business of anybody else. This attitude can be seen in everything as simple as the “be yourself” and “follow your dreams” statements many of us were raised on, to the more serious issues we deal with today of discrimination against the LGBTGA+ community, fat shaming, slut shaming, prejudice against muslim people, etc., to political issues like free speech and government invasion of privacy, and even into more subtle ideas present in social media of privacy settings, controlling who gets to see what posts, block and ignore features, and even the philosophy of “nobody can tell you what to post in your own space. If somebody doesn’t like it, they can unfollow.”
None of this would be happening consciously, of course, but we can’t help but be influenced by the world around us. And a phrase whose meaning is essentially “it’s none of your business” is very likely to resonate strongly with a group of people whose fundamental philosophies of polite interpersonal conduct revolve roughly around the same concept.
Taking all this into consideration, this joke is taking a lot of pre-knowledge and putting it all together to kind of say, in a funny way, “stop acting like you have it all figured out, because you don’t. And some things are just not for you to figure out anyway.”
So to sum up, to understand the above image, you must:
have a descent grasp on art history to recognize the original painting.
have good abstract and/or creative thinking skills to understand and appreciate the original painting.
have a good grasp on modern pop culture, internet culture, and current slang and memes (basically, be an active participant in the wider world).
have the complex emotional and interpersonal understanding necessary to understand the subtleties of sarcasm.
understand enough of what’s going on in the world around you that you are disenchanted enough to appreciate sarcastic humor.
participate in our generation’s general philosophy of life and how to interact with other human beings in the world at large.
So basically, if you laughed, you’re smart. :3

So I totally didn’t get the joke at first, but this was beautifully explained and now I understand, not only the joke, but a bunch of other stuff too. It’s wonderfully written and easy to understand. I’m down

fudgebrownys:

iammissanna:

tzikeh:

the-fault-in-our-wifi:

oh my fucking god

Everyone go home. The internet is over.

Okay, you know what? I just reblogged this but I wanna get geeky over it. ‘Cause this is some high-class humor right here, and if you don’t get that you need to be educated so here I am about to do the thing you’re not supposed to do and explain the joke, because I’m just really impressed by this joke’s construction, okay?

So back in Paris in the 1920s, the surrealist movement in art was just starting to take off. The surrealist movement was born from the dadaist movement, which was a response to strict societal ideas of what was “art” and what wasn’t. The dadaists made a lot of works to try and challenge society’s ideas of what art even was in the first place, and this continued on into the more sophisticated abstract works of surrealism.

One such artist, Rene Magritte (also known for his paintings of people with invisible heads, or with fruit for heads), painted a work called "The Treachery of Images," depicting a pipe, and underneath the words (in french) “This is Not a Pipe.” The words were meant to refer to the fact that the painted pipe was literally not a real physical pipe that a viewer could smoke out of, it was just a painting of a pipe.

The painting was extremely meta, and really challenged the habit of allowing oneself to get so immersed in a work of art that one forgets it is a created representation of life, and not actual life. Understanding that alone takes a good deal of abstract thinking ability. And really appreciating and enjoying it requires a certain amount of one’s own frustration with society’s habit of trying to put limits on the definition of art; and being unable to think outside the box and really see something from all possible perspectives, including the perspective of being completely outside the thing.

Now what’s even more fascinating to me is that modern art movements (and I don’t mean “modern art,” I mean actual contemporary art movements that are being led by our peers) are kinda doing the same thing the dadaist movement was doing, but in reaction to the art that came out of the dadaist movement. Things have circled back around again, and abstract surrealist art is now what society has decided “art” is. And our generation doesn’t accept that. Comics, video games, TV shows and movies, graffiti art, web series, even flash mobs, all of these are our generation’s way of saying, “no, society, you don’t get to define art as strictly as ‘if it doesn’t make sense to me it must be brilliant.’ Art can be simple to understand, art can be accessible to all people, art can make you beg to find out what happens next!” And that’s really interesting to me.

Flash forwards to 2006, when rapper Gucci Mane writes a song called "Pillz" in which the phrase “bitch I might be” was coined and used several times. In the song, it’s used as a sarcastic, somewhat indignant but not wholly angry way to say “it’s none of your business,” in response to a beautiful woman in a club accusing the rapper of being high. The phrase became a meme in 2013, following Gucci Mane’s indictment for assaulting a soldier, when a redditor photoshopped a screencap of news coverage of the trial to reference the song. The photoshopped image changed the previous on-screen text to read “Rapper Gucci Mane responds with ‘bitch I might be’ when asked if guilty”. Again, the usage of the phrase is a sarcastic and indignant “none of your business.” The phrase then quickly gained popularity and was added to numerous other photoshopped images.

Now, memes are really cool as a concept anyways, when you think about them hard enough (I mean, the speed at which an entire world full of young people are able to latch onto something as simple as a phrase that they all mutually find funny, and within a matter of days explore every possible usage and implication of that phrase, including how it might relate to other complex systems of knowledge and understanding such as the rich character and plot developments of stories that generate fandoms), but lets put that aside for now and talk about sarcasm, instead.

Because sarcasm is a very sophisticated, complex, and subtle form of wit. It’s a difficult thing to be able to understand, through tone of voice alone, that what someone says, and what they mean, are two different things. And to be able to discern the actual meaning when the words were not said. As wikipedia says, “different parts of the brain must work together to understand sarcasm.” It’s even harder when those words are typed and not spoken audibly, as the reader must imagine the tone in the first place. That’s a lot of brain work involved in even understanding the true meaning behind that simple little phrase.

And sarcasm is popular right now. More than popular, it’s a hallmark of our generation. People have been writing lengthy articles and psychological, sociological, and anthropological studies and musings on why we’re so sarcastic. As this article suggests, it’s because we’re so angry. We’re a generation that was promised a lot and the world didn’t deliver. We’re disenchanted, and jaded, and mad. And we vent that through sarcastic humor. We laugh at things older generations don’t think are funny. We have come to expect so much disappointment, that we no longer afford “serious” things the respect we’re told they deserve. Because we no longer believe they deserve it. As the article states, “We are a generation that believes nothing is sacred. And if nothing is sacred everything becomes profane.”

One could even go so far as to make the argument that the popularity of the statement on the above image is due partially to the attitude amongst today’s youth (especially on tumblr) that one’s own life and choices are one’s own, and not the business of anybody else. This attitude can be seen in everything as simple as the “be yourself” and “follow your dreams” statements many of us were raised on, to the more serious issues we deal with today of discrimination against the LGBTGA+ community, fat shaming, slut shaming, prejudice against muslim people, etc., to political issues like free speech and government invasion of privacy, and even into more subtle ideas present in social media of privacy settings, controlling who gets to see what posts, block and ignore features, and even the philosophy of “nobody can tell you what to post in your own space. If somebody doesn’t like it, they can unfollow.”

None of this would be happening consciously, of course, but we can’t help but be influenced by the world around us. And a phrase whose meaning is essentially “it’s none of your business” is very likely to resonate strongly with a group of people whose fundamental philosophies of polite interpersonal conduct revolve roughly around the same concept.

Taking all this into consideration, this joke is taking a lot of pre-knowledge and putting it all together to kind of say, in a funny way, “stop acting like you have it all figured out, because you don’t. And some things are just not for you to figure out anyway.”

So to sum up, to understand the above image, you must:

  1. have a descent grasp on art history to recognize the original painting.
  2. have good abstract and/or creative thinking skills to understand and appreciate the original painting.
  3. have a good grasp on modern pop culture, internet culture, and current slang and memes (basically, be an active participant in the wider world).
  4. have the complex emotional and interpersonal understanding necessary to understand the subtleties of sarcasm.
  5. understand enough of what’s going on in the world around you that you are disenchanted enough to appreciate sarcastic humor.
  6. participate in our generation’s general philosophy of life and how to interact with other human beings in the world at large.

So basically, if you laughed, you’re smart. :3

So I totally didn’t get the joke at first, but this was beautifully explained and now I understand, not only the joke, but a bunch of other stuff too. It’s wonderfully written and easy to understand. I’m down

(Source: thecitizeninsane)